FAQ

1. Are there any other treatments besides joint injections that will help my horse's performance?


There are many medications that can be administered by us or dispensed for your use that can help both slow down the osteoarthritis process, relieve inflammation, and promote healthy joint fluid production thus protecting the articular cartilage.  Below is a list of products we commonly recommend: 


  • intravenous legend (hyaluronic acid)
  • adequan (polysulfated glycosaminoglycans (PSGAGs),
  • injectable glucosamine (N-acetyl-D-glucosamine), 
  • polyglycan (a combination of hyaluronic acid, sodium chondroitin sulfate and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) 


Hyaluronic Acid 

Hyaluronic acid is a large molecule that is a normal component of the synovial fluid as well as a lining on top of the articular cartilage providing both cushion and lubrication effect. Effects of treatment: 


  • Lubrication
  • Anti-inflammatory


Adequan- PSGAGs (Polysulfated glycosaminoglycans)


PSGAGs are inhibitors of the enzymes that break down the healthy components of the joints and joint fluid.  They can be administered into the joint directly or IV/IM.  Effects of treatment:


  • inhibit the destruction of healthy joint tissue and joint fluid
  • inhibit inflammation
  • stimulate synovial fluid production
  • promotes hyaluronic acid production which causes the joint fluid to have improved viscosity


N-acetyl-D-Glucosamine


This drug is a component of hyaluronic acid, which is the substance that provides the viscosity of the joint fluid.  This product can be administered IM of IV.  Effects of treatment: 


  • reduces inflammation
  • provides a precursor for healthy joint fluid and cartilage production


Polyglycan


A combination of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, and glucosamine


  • reduces inflammation
  • lubrication
  • stimulates synovial fluid production


There are many medications that can be administered by us or dispensed for your use that can help both slow down the osteoarthritis process, relieve inflammation, and promote healthy joint fluid production thus protecting the articular cartilage.  Below is a list of products we commonly recommend:-intravenous legend (hyaluronic acid)-adequan (polysulfated glycosaminoglycans (PSGAGs),-injectable glucosamine (N-acetyl-D-glucosamine),-polyglycan (a combination of hyaluronic acid, sodium chondroitin sulfate and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine)Hyaluronic acid is a large molecule that is a normal component of the synovial fluid as well as a lining on top of the articular cartilage providing both cushion and lubrication effect. Effects of treatment:-Lubrication-Anti-inflammatoryPSGAGs are inhibitors of the enzymes that break down the healthy components of the joints and joint fluid.  They can be administered into the joint directly or IV/IM.  Effects of treatment:-inhibit the destruction of healthy joint tissue and joint fluid-inhibit inflammation-stimulate synovial fluid production-promotes hyaluronic acid production which causes the joint fluid to have improved viscosityThis drug is a component of hyaluronic acid, which is the substance that provides the viscosity of the joint fluid.  This product can be administered IM of IV.  Effects of treatment:-reduces inflammation-provides a precursor for healthy joint fluid and cartilage productionA combination of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, and glucosamine-reduces inflammation-lubrication-stimulates synovial fluid production.


2. My horse is showing signs of lameness and has no signs of obvious injury what should I do?


  • Try to isolate the limb which is causing the lameness. Use a trainer, mirrors, or other observers, or have someone jog the horse for you.  
  •  How fast was the onset of the lameness? How severe is the lameness? Is it a subtle head nod noticeable at the trot only? Something you can only feel while riding? Can your horse bear weight on the limb?
  •  In all scenarios, it is recommended and appropriate that you first contact your veterinarian for advice concerning your horse’s specific lameness. 
  • In general:

           · if your horse is suddenly not able to bear weight on a limb, it is an emergency!  Even severe lameness that is evident at a walk can be                          considered an emergency. Confine the horse to a stall and contact your veterinarian.
           · For less severe lamenesses, rest from work for several days to a week may be helpful. If the lameness is persistent and interfering with your                horse’s performance needs, it is probably time to contact your veterinarian.
           · Your veterinarian may suggest treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (such as phenylbutazone), an oral or injectable joint              supplement, joint injections, or a variety of alternative treatments.


3. My horse doesn’t perform his riding/racing skills with the same ease and skill he previously did, how should I proceed?


  • Often a decrease in performance over time is normal as horses age.  With use and exercise over a lifetime, many horses become arthritic and less able to perform to their previous ability.
  • There are many options available to horse owners now to help improve and lengthen their horses’ athletic careers:

           · Injectable joint supplements such as glucosamine, adequan, polyglycan, or pentosan
           · Joint injections to treat specific areas of arthritis
           · acupuncture to treat muscle soreness
           · internal blister to strengthen weak muscle areas
           · chiropractic adjustments

  • Preventative maintenance is one of the best ways to prolong your horse’s athletic career and to spend less money on pain management in the long term.


4. I am about to purchase a new horse for the first time, is there anything I should have done prior to purchase?


  • Pre-purchase examinations, while expensive, are one of the best ways to avoid future financial stress and heartache when purchasing a new horse.
  • Pre-purchase examinations are tailored specifically to fit your purchasing needs.  In general, a full physical examination including ocular exams and full boodwork are recommended. 
  • Because the main use of most horses is to be an athlete in some capacity, a conformation and lameness examination is recommended.  Flexion tests are usually performed to see what areas the horse may have developed arthritis or other issues, as well as hoof testing. 
  • The results of the lameness examination help us to decide what areas to radiograph.
  • The results of the pre-purchase examination allow you to decide whether the horse will be able to suit your needs at the time of purchase and in the future


5. My horse is off his feed and is losing weight, what should I do to investigate this?


  • There are a number of things that can cause weight loss and inappetance in horses.  A full physical examination is warranted in these cases to try to discover the root of the problem.

           · Fecal examination to look for parasites which may be causing weight loss
           · A complete dental examination/teeth floating may be warranted to ensure your horse is properly chewing his food.
           · Full screening bloodwork to investigate underlying diseases
           · Examination of your horse’s nutrition